Please no plagiarism and make sure you are able to access all resource on your o

Please no plagiarism and make sure you are able to access all resource on your own before you bid. One of the references must come from Broderick and Blewitt (2015). I need this completed by 01/21/18 at 12pm. Respond to my colleagues using one or more of the following approaches:
· Select a colleague who was assigned a different client than you. Validate his or her perspective or propose an alternative perspective to at least one aspect of his or her posting (developmental level, rapport and engagement, or treatment). Support your response with specific references to the client family presented in the case study and to the current literature.
· Select a colleague who was assigned the same client as you. Contrast your posts. Support your response by explaining how you might combine strengths from each of your posts to provide a better analysis of or treatment for the client.

1. Classmate (A. Wit)
My client is the Martinez family.  Gabby Martinez is 19-years-old and living at home with her parents and younger siblings (Laureate Education, 2013).  Instead of going to college, Gabby has moved from one low-paying job to another.  She has not found a position she likes and has been fired several times for missing work.  In addition to vocational troubles, Gabby is under pressure from her parents to find a husband.  Gabby feels she is too young for marriage and feels lost and anxious.  In this post, I will describe Gabby’s developmental level and Super’s developmental approach in the counseling process.
Developmental level
The period of young adulthood is marked by events such as completing education, entering the workforce, and leaving home (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  Although the adulthood may emerge as young as 18, the crisis of persona and identity formation may extend through the 20’s, 30’s and 40’s (Robinson & Smith, 2010).  Gabby, at 19-years-old, has joined the workforce, but still lives at home with her parents.  She is in a transitional phase, having met the marker event of finishing high-school and starting work, but still lives at home under her parents’ rules.  Early adulthood is a time of great learning when vocational, romantic, and social interests develop (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  During this phase, Gabby’s feelings of being lost, anxious, confused, and overwhelmed are common (Arnett, 2007).  Gabby’s living situation may be one factor contributing to her anxiety and confusion.  Most adults generally leave the family nest by age 19, where they have an opportunity to focus on their self-development and interests (Arnett, 2007).
Building rapport
Building a strong, trusting relationship is essential in working with all clients.  With, Gabby, counseling should be a space where she is free to explore her emerging identity and interests.  At home, Gabby is under significant scrutiny from her parents.  Her parents have marriage and vocational expectations for her that may be inhibiting autonomy.  As her counselor, I would create a supportive, non-judgmental environment where she is free to express herself.  For young adults who are suffering from identity crisis, Robinson and Smith (2010) suggest that counselors using probing pre-crisis questions.  For example, “did you feel in control of your life?” or “how do you remember feeling?” (Robinson & Smith, 2010).  With Gabby, I would explore how her feelings about herself and her relationship with her parents may have changed since she graduated from high-school. 
Counseling approach
One counseling strategy with Gabby would be employing Super’s developmental approach.  Super suggests that satisfying employment correlates with personal characteristics and the emergence of vocational self-concept (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  Gabby may be more likely to find a job she enjoys if the counselor can help identify her unique qualities and the opportunities that exist within her network (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  Vocational self-concept changes through adulthood (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  At 19, Gabby is in Super’s exploratory stage, marked by narrowing interests without finalized career choices (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).  The counselor can point out the Gabby’s multiple jobs may be a strength, informing her of what she does not want to do.  Super’s approach highlights that vocational self-concept and career path are continuous processes (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).
Summary
It is not uncommon for emerging adults to feel lost or anxious.  Many individuals are navigating independence and free-will with the comfort (and discomfort) of living with their parents.  In working with this population, a strong, supportive therapeutic relationship is essential.  There are many counseling approaches, including Super’s developmental approach, which meet the client where they are during this transitional phase.
References
Arnett, J. J. (2007). Suffering, selfish, slackers? Myths and reality about emerging adults. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 36(1), 23–29.
Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education
Laureate Education (Producer). (2013). Adolescence [Video file]. Retrieved from CDN Files Database.
Robinson, O. C., & Smith, J. A. (2010). The stormy search for self in early adulthood: Developmental crisis and the dissolution of dysfunctional personae. The Humanistic Psychologist, 38(2), 120–145.

2. (Classmate B. Smi)
Olivia, age 19, of the Crane family is my assigned client for the week. Olivia is home for a term break from college. Her mother, Carol, is concerned that Olivia exhibits signs of depression. When asked about this, Olivia declares many of her class and schoolmates are “snobs” with whom she’d rather not be friends with. She also expression academic struggles despite maintaining a 3.0 grade point average. Olivia also makes it very clear that she has no desire to date after observing her parents’ relationship.
Rapport and Engagement
   Emerging adulthood, as defined by Jeffery Arnett, is the time period between the age of 18 and 25 (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). Within emerging adulthood, social networks expand, more lifestyle and occupational options become available, and individuals seek and gain autonomy. Once an individual has reached this age bracket, they’ve likely completed physical growth. Research also shows the brain continues to develop during the transition from adolescence to early adulthood (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015).
    To develop rapport with Olivia, I might ensure that she is aware that this is a safe space and that the things we discuss are confidential. To promote engagement within sessions, I would as Olivia to tell me more about her college experience. I would want to know her expectations for herself. For example, she expresses feeling that nothing she does is good enough and having selected the hardest professors, however, she is maintaining a very solid g.p.a.
Counseling Approach and Theoretical Orientation
For this this week’s discussion, I’ve decided to utilize Schaie’s Theory. Schaie’s theory rests on the belief that individuals face different types of issues with each new phase of adulthood. The theory highlights how important is for individuals to utilize their intelligence to navigate the new roles, needs, and responsibilities as they move throughout adulthood (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). As Olivia is currently an emerging adult, she would currently be in the achieving stage, according to Schaie’s theory. Schaie declares this period as a time where individual use their intellect to maneuver challenges as well as determine their possible consequences (Broderick & Blewitt, 2015). In working with Olivia, it’d be imperative for the counselor to asssit her in identifying and discussing the possible consequences of her actions and behaviors. Possibly discuss her decision to be alone and not make any new friends, her goals of raising her g.p.a. and academic improvement, and her refusal to be committed to anyone ever. I don’t believe this discussions should in any way attempt to tell Olivia why her discussions are poor but instead get her to discuss what she believes the consequences or results could be.
Summary
      In conclusion, I believe Schaie’s Theory would be best in a counselor’s work with Olivia as it derives from the belief that obstacles, choices, and consequence change as the individual moves throughout adulthood. I believe this is so in all things in life. Biggie Smalls said it best when he recited “mo money mo problems.” I believe this to be the same with an emerging adult as they ar e gaining autonomy, more resources and more choices. However, whenever you receive more, the risk is often higher. This could be said about an emerging adult that is debating on whether to move out on their own, attend college in or out of state, quit their job, and a number of other scenarios.
References
Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.
Laureate Education (Producer). (2013m). Young adulthood [Video file]. Retrieved from CDN Files Database. (COUN 6215/COUN 8215/HUMN 8215) 
Smits, I., Doumen, S., Luyckx, K., Duriez, B., & Goossens, L. (2011). Identity styles and interpersonal behavior in emerging adulthood: The intervening role of empathy. Social Development, 20(4), 664–684.
Readings
· Broderick, P. C., & Blewitt, P. (2015). The life span: Human development for helping professionals (4th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education.
o Chapter 11, “Physical and Cognitive Development in Young Adulthood” (pp. 408-437)
o Chapter 12, “Socioemotional and Vocational Development in Young Adulthood” (pp. 438-476)
Arnett, J. J. (2007). Suffering, selfish, slackers? Myths and reality about emerging adults. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 36(1), 23–29.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Benson, J. E., Johnson, M. K., & Elder, G. H., Jr. (2012). The implications of adult identity for educational and work attainment in young adulthood. Developmental Psychology, 48(6), 1752–1758.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Brandell, J. R. (2010). Contemporary psychoanalytic perspectives on attachment. Psychoanalytic Social Work, 17(2), 132–157.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
McAdams, D. P., Bauer, J. J., Sakaeda, A. R., Anyidoho, N. A., Machado, M. A., Magrino-Failla, K., … Pals, J. L. (2006). Continuity and change in the life story: A longitudinal study of autobiographical memories in emerging adulthood. Journal of Personality, 74(5), 1371–1400.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
O’Connor, M., Sanson, A., Hawkins, M. T., Letcher, P., Toumbourou, J., Smart, D., … Olsson, C. (2011). Predictors of positive development in emerging adulthood. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40(7),860–874.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Robinson, O. C., & Smith, J. A. (2010). The stormy search for self in early adulthood: Developmental crisis and the dissolution of dysfunctional personae. The Humanistic Psychologist, 38(2), 120–145.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Rodriguez, P. D., & Ritchie, K. L. (2009). Relationship between coping styles and adult attachment styles. Journal of the Indiana Academy of the Social Sciences, 13, 131–141.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Smits, I., Doumen, S., Luyckx, K., Duriez, B., & Goossens, L. (2011). Identity styles and interpersonal behavior in emerging adulthood: The intervening role of empathy. Social Development, 20(4), 664–684.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Specht, J., Egloff, B., & Schmukle, S. C. (2011). Stability and change of personality across the life course: The impact of age and major life events on mean-level and rank-order stability of the Big Five. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 101(4), 862–882.
Retrieved from the Walden Library databases.
Fraley, R. C. (n.d.). Attachment style. Retrieved March 10, 2013 from http://www.web-research-design.net/cgi-bin/crq/crq.pl 
Media
· Laureate Education (Producer). (2013m). Young adulthood [Video file]. Retrieved from CDN Files Database. (COUN 6215/COUN 8215/HUMN 8215)
 
This media piece highlights the family member aged 19–29.
 
Note: Please click on the following link for the transcript: Transcript (PDF).
· Laureate Education (Producer). (2013f). Perspectives: Emerging adulthood [Video file]. Retrieved from https://class.waldenu.edu
 
Note: The approximate length of this media piece is 3 minutes.
 
This week’s presenter highlights the challenges of working with clients in the 19–30 year-old age range, as well as the ways in which emerging adulthood is much like a “second adolescence.”
Accessible player  –Downloads– Download Video w/CC Download Audio Download Transcript 

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