Survivor and Responder Disaster Responses People can react to crises and disast

Survivor and Responder Disaster Responses
People can react to crises and disasters in a variety of ways. Keep in mind, however, that mental health professionals do not label reactions as “symptoms,” or speak in terms of a “ diagnoses” or “pathology” when responding to survivors of a crisis. One interesting way to better understand the scope of survivor reactions is to think of them in the context of Bronfenbrenner’s Chronosystem Model, a lifespan perspective. Where crises are concerned, the lifespan begins when the crisis starts. Although, where interventions are concerned, the counselor leader must look into the person’s past for precursors that might impact current reactions. Precursors may influence a counselor’s and other responders’ susceptibility to vicarious trauma reactions as well.

Cognitive, psychological, and physical reactions are common after a crisis. These may include crisis re-experiencing, hyperarousal, and avoidance reactions, which may meet the requirements for symptoms described in the DSM-IV-TR for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). There are times when crisis responders allow survivors’ reactions to become their own, and secondary vicarious trauma or compassion fatigue may result. Helping professionals may be at risk for this to occur because of the nature of helping professionals’ commitment and involvement with clients.

When crises or disasters happen back to back, such as the 2010 massive earthquake in Haiti which was preceded by several destructive hurricanes, reactions of survivors and professionals who attend to them can be magnified.

To prepare for this Discussion

Review Chapters 7, 12, and 16 in your course text, Crisis Intervention Strategies, paying particular attention to the possible consequences of trauma on counselors and other first responders.

Review the article, “The Effects of Vicarious Exposure to the Recent Massacre at Virginia Tech,” focusing on the results of the vicarious trauma study presented.

Review the article, “Psychological Problems Among Aid Workers Operating in Darfur,”and think about ways to help responders during and after crises.

Review the article, “Crisis Intervention with Survivors of Natural Disaster: Lessons from Hurricane Andrew,” and focus on factors related to crisis intervention and how these may differ from individual therapy interventions.

Review the article, “Preventing Vicarious Trauma: What Counselors Should Know When Working with Trauma Survivors,” and think about preventions associated with vicarious trauma.

With these thoughts in mind

Post an analysis of implications of vicarious trauma, burnout, and compassion fatigue for counselors and first responders. Be specific and provide examples.

Course Text: James, R. K. & Gilliland, B.E. (2017). Crisis intervention strategies (8th ed.). Boston, MA: Cengage Learning. 

Chapters 7
https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781305888081/pageid/166

Chapter 12
https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781305888081/pageid/394

Chapter 16
https://bookshelf.vitalsource.com/books/9781305888081/pageid/567

With these thoughts in mind:

Post  an analysis of implications of vicarious trauma, burnout, and compassion fatigue for counselors and first responders. Be specific and provide examples.

Be sure to support your postings and responses with specific references from the Learning Resources.

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