How does Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) affect the hematologic system?

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Mucor is a fungus, a specie of moulds commonly found in the soil, plant surfaces, rotten foods and in the digestive system. (Mucor- Wikipedia).
Pathophysiology:  Fungus usually affect people whose immune system has been compromised/weakened by other health conditions, healthy people can also be affected. It mostly affects the sinuses or the lungs by inhalation of the fungal pores in the air. It can also enter through an impaired skin integrity such as cuts, scrapes, burns or trauma. (Mucormycosis|Fungal Disease|CDC, 2015). Reactivation of latent infection can also, result in fungal pneumonia. Once the fungi is in the alveoli it can travel in the spaces between the cells and adjacent alveoli via connecting pores. Invasion of the fungi in the alveoli triggers the immune response to send out neutrophils from WBCs to attack the microorganism. The neutrophils destroy the attacking organism but then release cytokines in that process leading to general activation of immune system causing the fever, fatigue and chiles noted in fungal or bacterial pneumonia. The alveoli is then filled up with the fluid leaked from surrounding blood vessels and neutrophils causing an impairment in gas exchange. (Fungal Pneumonia-Wikipedia).

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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the coexistence of chronic bronchitis and emphysema. Compare emphysema and chronic bronchitis. What are the hallmark assessment findings for each? What should your patient teaching include? How does COPD affect the hematologic system? Describe the pathophysiology.

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