Basic components of a Proposal Letter

I would like to write a grant request letter. I have the assignment files uploaded and the the basic components of writing a grant request and whom it’s directed for. The hypothetical project we want to fund is a neighborhood sculpture garden. I need a minimum of one page (single space) in 10 hours please. 

Basic components of a Proposal Letter:

Private foundation proposals differ greatly from most federal proposals. While foundations often outline the general format that they prefer, there is more latitude regarding the structure of the narrative. Always frame your proposal to align as closely as possible to the funders programs’ stated mission, without going so far that you are compromising your research interests. 
Further, if there is a published  list of judges/reviewers available, as is usually the case for scientific applications, try to compose your proposal so that it piques the interest of one or more of the judges’ expertise.
1.  Abstract/Summary

The abstract is the most important component of the proposal. Spend time developing the best possible title. If the length is not mandated, it should be no longer than one half to one page maximum. 
Use bolded subheadings. Include highlights in the topic sentence in each section of the proposal. 
What will be done, by whom, how, over what period of time? What is the problem/need? Who will the outcomes benefit? 

2. Statement of Need

What is the issue that you are addressing and why does it matter?
Why is what you propose necessary? What is the void in Knowledge? 
Who benefits? Indicate the public good, not just the effect on campus. 
Why hasn’t this issue been addressed sufficiently in the past? Who else is working in this field, what have they done, and why isn’t that enough? Demonstrate your knowledge of the field.
Provide convincing evidence that what you are proposing does not duplicate other work. Replication of someone else’s work in a new environment or larger scale may be fundable.

3. Project Activity, Methodology and Outcomes

Why did you choose to address the issue in the manner that you have? Are there other approaches? If so, why aren’t they appropriate to the situation?
What are the specific activities involved? Who will do them? 
Present a timeline of activities. Tables and charts work best here. They crystallize data, break up pages of narrative, and convey extensive information well in a limited space.
What specific outcomes will be achieved? What will change? 
Why are you/your organization the best one to do what you propose to do? Is it an extension of successful, innovative work or a pilot project you already completed?

4. Evaluation

Essential piece that should be both quantitative and qualitative, if feasible. 
Outline clearly the methodology that you will use to assess the projects success.

5. Dissemination

Dissemination should be linked to your project goals and objectives. If you are trying to affect policy, your dissemination plan should target policy-makers, media, and affected populations.
Describe your communication strategy.
Be creative. Sending an article to a professional journal is only one of many options. Consider submitting op-ed pieces to newspapers and articles to more popular periodicals; work with University Relations to obtain newspaper coverage and interviews on local radio stations; engage in conference presentations, community outreach activities, presentations to policy-makers and community groups, such as the Chamber of Commerce; launch a web site or blog; convene work groups of your peers; create briefing papers, press releases, videos; and, list yourself on speakers bureaus.

6. Budget and Continuation Funding

Show your budget in table form and use a budget narrative to explain each item.
Only Include other sources of funding if the funder mandates it’s inclusion. UMass policy does not allow including in-kind or outside contributions unless it is required, as it adds administrative burden and costs.
Indicate how the project will be funded or be sustainable after the grant funds have run out.
The Office of Grants and Contract Administration (OGCA) makes available all university policies covering all legal, fiscal, human resources and intellectual property issues.

Link of the foundation we’re requesting funding from:

Grant Programs | Oklahoma City Community Foundation
▼ Parks & Public Space Initiative/Margaret Annis Boys Trust
The Parks & Public Space Initiative is a program designed to support the development of parks to meet the health, cultural and recreational needs of citizens in central Oklahoma. This initiative grew out of the Margaret Annis Boys Trust, which was established through a gift from Miss Boys’ estate in 1991 to support and encourage landscaping and beautification projects in parks, medians and other public lands in Oklahoma City. Grants from the Initiative and the Trust will support the planning, implementation and/or program development to encourage use of neighborhood and community public parks or spaces open to the public. Nonprofit organizations, neighborhood associations, municipalities and/or other groups with a vested interest in the development, beautification or expanded use of a particular space are eligible to apply. To review the guidelines and application process, please click here.

  Visit an art museum/exhibit OR attend a classical music concert OR attend a pl

 
Visit an art museum/exhibit OR attend a classical music concert OR attend a play OR watch the movie Amadeus. Pick the applicable temple and write answers to the questions in the template. You have two of the same assignments this semester. You will do two of the four options. For example, if you attend a museum or gallery for your first assignment, you must attend either a classical concert, attend a play, or watch Amadeus for the second write-up. (Note: each of the Cultural Experience assignments is worth 10% of your final grade – 20% total)
Instructions (you must follow these instructions to get full credit!)
Attendance must be DURING this semester, not something you did last summer, etc.
General directions:

Answer all questions in the write-up template with the appropriate amount of detail as specified for each question.  This is what you will be turning in. (My suggestion is to download the template and then just type your answers under each question.)
Use standard 12-point Times New Roman font. 
Full citations must be included in the paper for any research. (Points will be deducted for partial citations or no citations.)
Copy and paste your assignment in appropriate place the Assignments folder online. (Points will be deducted if you only attach a document and not copy/paste.)

Grading:  each assignment is worth 100 points.  The breakdown of points as follows:
Questions about event                                                50%
Research                                                                      30%
Following directions (including citations)                  20% 

Please write one paper following the instrument.    Organize the paper, which sh

Please write one paper following the instrument.
  
Organize the paper, which should be five to seven (5-7) pages in length, into an introductory paragraph, body, and conclusion. The introduction may include some general information (e.g., historical, economic, cultural) about the object’s specific time period, the technique utilized to create the object, etc. More importantly, the introduction should include a thesis statement about the object’s overall aesthetic. Then organize the body in a logical, analytic fashion, and conclude the paper with some remarks about the significance of the object — that is, how it fits into a larger Renaissance to Rococo art historical framework. 
Remember, this is NOT a research paper; however, if you quote a source (e.g., a placard or web site from the museum), be sure to cite it.

This Color Wheel Project should be mailed (Rio Salado Drop Box or U.S. Post) to

This Color Wheel Project should be mailed (Rio Salado Drop Box or U.S. Post) to your instructor. Please review your syllabus for instructions on how to submit assignments. Check the class calendar for the due date.
For this assignment, you will create a 12-color wheel. The color wheel is the basic tool that people use when working with color. The 12 hues are found in the spectrum of color. (Refer to page 34 of the textbook as well as the links located in “Summarizing Your Learning” in this lesson.) The color wheel is divided into three categories: primary hues, secondary hues (made by combining primary colors), and tertiary hues (made by combining secondary hues).

Objectives:
The intent of this assignment is to develop an understanding of color by:

mixing the primary colors to create a 12-step color wheel
painting a series of chips that represent the color spectrum
assembling and labeling a 12-step color wheel

Procedure:
Templates will be provided for you to use for this assignment by clicking on the appropriate links. When you access the links provided in this lesson under “Assessing Your Learning,” you will find three template links. These .pdf links may open at the wrong size on your computer. When the .pdf opens, you will find a box at the top that shows the percentage (size) of the image. Please change this percentage to 100% so the image will print properly.
Click on this Color Wheel Template link and print out the template. You will use this template for the 12-step color wheel. Remember to change the .pdf to 100% before printing.
Use this template to assist you in drawing the color wheel. Take the template and flip it over. Taking a #2 pencil, scribble on the backside of the paper, making sure that you have covered the whole template. (If you have carbon paper, you can use it instead.) By covering the backside of the paper, you have created a type of carbon paper. Now, turn the paper over and lay it on top (with the carbon side down) of a piece of 8″ x 10” illustration board. Using masking tape, tape the corners of the paper down to the board. Using a pen or fine line marker (pressing down), trace around the template. In doing so, you will be drawing an exact duplicate on to the illustration board. When you are sure you have completely drawn over the template, remove the tape. You should see the whole design traced on to the illustration board.
Now, click on this Primary Color Template link and print out the template. You will use this template for drawing the secondary colors. Following the same directions, draw in this design as seen in the example. Remember to change the .pdf to 100% before printing.
Next, open this Secondary Color Template link and print out the template. You will use this template for drawing the secondary colors. Following the same directions, draw in this design as seen in the example. Remember to change the .pdf to 100% before printing
You should now have an image on the illustration board that looks like this:

Proceed neatly and carefully to paint in each of the individual color shapes. You will be scored for technical competency as well as for the demonstration of your knowledge of the color wheel. (Use the example image in this lesson as a reference.)
Here is an easy way to remember how to mix colors: 1+1=2 and 1+2=3.
(Primary + Primary = Secondary and Primary + Secondary = Tertiary.)
First, paint the primary colors in the appropriate areas of the color wheel, using the picture above as a reference, and then proceed to paint in each color for the secondary and tertiary colors by “mixing” primary colors to create the rest of the color wheel within the proper spaces. Mix the colors yourself so you can visually see the color transformation that occurs. Do not use secondary and tertiary colors out of a tube of paint. Be sure that you let the colors dry before moving on to a color “next to” one you have just painted. Hint: You can use a blow dryer to speed up the drying process. Do not hold the blow dryer too close to the paint.
Label each of the colors. You can use your computer to type out (or neatly print) the names of the colors and then cut and paste them to the illustration board as shown in this example:
Once you have completed the color wheel, do not forget to sign your work on the bottom right-hand corner.
When you complete your assignment, be sure to make two color photocopies of your work. Send one with your assignment and keep one for your file.
Materials

1- 8 1/2″ x 11″ sheet of illustration board

#2 pencil

Fine line marker or roller ball pen (black)

Acrylic paint (2 oz. tubes) (refer to material list)

Palette for mixing paint

Paint brush

Compass

  Visit an art museum/exhibit OR attend a classical music concert OR attend a pl

 
Visit an art museum/exhibit OR attend a classical music concert OR attend a play OR watch the movie Amadeus. Pick the applicable temple and write answers to the questions in the template. You have two of the same assignments this semester. You will do two of the four options. For example, if you attend a museum or gallery for your first assignment, you must attend either a classical concert, attend a play, or watch Amadeus for the second write-up. (Note: each of the Cultural Experience assignments is worth 10% of your final grade – 20% total)
Instructions (you must follow these instructions to get full credit!)
Attendance must be DURING this semester, not something you did last summer, etc.
General directions:

Answer all questions in the write-up template with the appropriate amount of detail as specified for each question.  This is what you will be turning in. (My suggestion is to download the template and then just type your answers under each question.)
Use standard 12-point Times New Roman font. 
Full citations must be included in the paper for any research. (Points will be deducted for partial citations or no citations.)
Copy and paste your assignment in appropriate place the Assignments folder online. (Points will be deducted if you only attach a document and not copy/paste.)

Grading:  each assignment is worth 100 points.  The breakdown of points as follows:
Questions about event                                                50%
Research                                                                      30%
Following directions (including citations)                  20% 

Please write one paper following the instrument.    Organize the paper, which sh

Please write one paper following the instrument.
  
Organize the paper, which should be five to seven (5-7) pages in length, into an introductory paragraph, body, and conclusion. The introduction may include some general information (e.g., historical, economic, cultural) about the object’s specific time period, the technique utilized to create the object, etc. More importantly, the introduction should include a thesis statement about the object’s overall aesthetic. Then organize the body in a logical, analytic fashion, and conclude the paper with some remarks about the significance of the object — that is, how it fits into a larger Renaissance to Rococo art historical framework. 
Remember, this is NOT a research paper; however, if you quote a source (e.g., a placard or web site from the museum), be sure to cite it.

This Color Wheel Project should be mailed (Rio Salado Drop Box or U.S. Post) to

This Color Wheel Project should be mailed (Rio Salado Drop Box or U.S. Post) to your instructor. Please review your syllabus for instructions on how to submit assignments. Check the class calendar for the due date.
For this assignment, you will create a 12-color wheel. The color wheel is the basic tool that people use when working with color. The 12 hues are found in the spectrum of color. (Refer to page 34 of the textbook as well as the links located in “Summarizing Your Learning” in this lesson.) The color wheel is divided into three categories: primary hues, secondary hues (made by combining primary colors), and tertiary hues (made by combining secondary hues).

Objectives:
The intent of this assignment is to develop an understanding of color by:

mixing the primary colors to create a 12-step color wheel
painting a series of chips that represent the color spectrum
assembling and labeling a 12-step color wheel

Procedure:
Templates will be provided for you to use for this assignment by clicking on the appropriate links. When you access the links provided in this lesson under “Assessing Your Learning,” you will find three template links. These .pdf links may open at the wrong size on your computer. When the .pdf opens, you will find a box at the top that shows the percentage (size) of the image. Please change this percentage to 100% so the image will print properly.
Click on this Color Wheel Template link and print out the template. You will use this template for the 12-step color wheel. Remember to change the .pdf to 100% before printing.
Use this template to assist you in drawing the color wheel. Take the template and flip it over. Taking a #2 pencil, scribble on the backside of the paper, making sure that you have covered the whole template. (If you have carbon paper, you can use it instead.) By covering the backside of the paper, you have created a type of carbon paper. Now, turn the paper over and lay it on top (with the carbon side down) of a piece of 8″ x 10” illustration board. Using masking tape, tape the corners of the paper down to the board. Using a pen or fine line marker (pressing down), trace around the template. In doing so, you will be drawing an exact duplicate on to the illustration board. When you are sure you have completely drawn over the template, remove the tape. You should see the whole design traced on to the illustration board.
Now, click on this Primary Color Template link and print out the template. You will use this template for drawing the secondary colors. Following the same directions, draw in this design as seen in the example. Remember to change the .pdf to 100% before printing.
Next, open this Secondary Color Template link and print out the template. You will use this template for drawing the secondary colors. Following the same directions, draw in this design as seen in the example. Remember to change the .pdf to 100% before printing
You should now have an image on the illustration board that looks like this:

Proceed neatly and carefully to paint in each of the individual color shapes. You will be scored for technical competency as well as for the demonstration of your knowledge of the color wheel. (Use the example image in this lesson as a reference.)
Here is an easy way to remember how to mix colors: 1+1=2 and 1+2=3.
(Primary + Primary = Secondary and Primary + Secondary = Tertiary.)
First, paint the primary colors in the appropriate areas of the color wheel, using the picture above as a reference, and then proceed to paint in each color for the secondary and tertiary colors by “mixing” primary colors to create the rest of the color wheel within the proper spaces. Mix the colors yourself so you can visually see the color transformation that occurs. Do not use secondary and tertiary colors out of a tube of paint. Be sure that you let the colors dry before moving on to a color “next to” one you have just painted. Hint: You can use a blow dryer to speed up the drying process. Do not hold the blow dryer too close to the paint.
Label each of the colors. You can use your computer to type out (or neatly print) the names of the colors and then cut and paste them to the illustration board as shown in this example:
Once you have completed the color wheel, do not forget to sign your work on the bottom right-hand corner.
When you complete your assignment, be sure to make two color photocopies of your work. Send one with your assignment and keep one for your file.
Materials

1- 8 1/2″ x 11″ sheet of illustration board

#2 pencil

Fine line marker or roller ball pen (black)

Acrylic paint (2 oz. tubes) (refer to material list)

Palette for mixing paint

Paint brush

Compass