Compose your journal using first-person language. Follow APA formatting includ

 
Compose your journal using first-person language. Follow APA formatting including in-text citations and a reference page covering the discussion points below.  
In Chapter 10 of our text by Lopez, the term intervention is defined as “taking action so as to improve a situation” (2013, p.123). Lopez also discusses the theory of “fixing” versus the provision of “extra” support and proposes that investing and using one’s time “intentionally” is a better investment than money. 

1. Describe how your understanding and application of the term “intervention” has changed after considering Lopez’s remarks in Chapter 10.
2. Make a list of interventions currently taking place both inside and outside of today’s classroom.
3. Make a list of interventions that you would like to see take place inside and outside of today’s classroom.
4. Which interventions are the result of money, time,  or volunteers?
5. After you had addressed questions 1 through 4, what gaps do you see in interventions? What advice would you give a school in creating an exceptional intervention model that could fill those gaps? 

 
Lopez, D. (2013). No excuses university: How six exceptional systems are revolutionizing our schools(2nd ed.). Turnaround Schools Publications.

Chapter 10: Interventions (p.120)

This chapter addresses how to take action in order to improve a situation.  It places value on interventions put into place  for extra support, and not simply using interventions when  something needs to be fixed.

  Teacher Leadership Watch the Tedx Talks video, Play, Passion, Purpose: Tony Wa

 
Teacher Leadership
Watch the Tedx Talks video, Play, Passion, Purpose: Tony Wagner @ TEDxNYED .

1. In his Ted Talk, Tony Wagner shares that our schools are not failing and do not need reforming. Rather, he shares, our system is obsolete and needs reinventing. Given the idea that we need to prepare our students for a future in which there are many uncertainties, including which jobs will be of importance or even in existence, is the way in which teachers are gaining leadership opportunities contrary to this thinking? 

2. If the research shows that students need to think in new ways, do you think schools foster those skills in the way teachers are expected to operate? Are there changes you would suggest?

 

Unit 3 DB   Within the Discussion Board area, write 400–600 words that respond t

Unit 3 DB
 
Within the Discussion Board area, write 400–600 words that respond to the following questions with your thoughts, ideas, and comments. This will be the foundation for future discussions by your classmates. Be substantive and clear, and use examples to reinforce your ideas.
As a health care manager, you will be involved in strategic management. Discuss the following in regard to this:

Does strategic management involve long-term or short-term activities?
Describe how strategic management helps your facility control the future.

Be sure to support your information by citing at least 2 references in APA format.
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Unit 3 IP
 
As a new health care manager, you will need to have an organizational chart of the facility and of your department. Complete the following for this assignment:

In PowerPoint or Word, develop a simple organizational chart for a facility or for 1 department. 

Make this chart original.
Do not use real names or companies. 

**FOLLOW THE GRADING RUBRIC, There should be no written grammatical errors and m

**FOLLOW THE GRADING RUBRIC, There should be no written grammatical errors and meet ALL page limit requirements as well as source limits**

EDU 671

Intervention/Innovation Method
Instructions: For this assignment, you will write a method paper than contains the items listed in the content below.
Content
The assignment needs to include the following areas of content.

Intervention – Overview (.5 point): In no more than one page, explain your proposed intervention.
Intervention – Literature Review (1 point): In no more than one page, discuss your literature review and how it informs your proposed intervention.
Intervention – Benefits (.5 point): In no more than one  page, explain why you think your population will benefit from the  intervention. Ensure your explanation draws on the literature you are  using to support this choice of intervention. 
Intervention Plan (2 points): In one- to two-pages,  describe in chronological order how you will implement your intervention  and provide a hypothetical yet practical timeframe for these steps.
Ethics – Philosophy (.5 point): In one- to  two-paragraphs, explain how this intervention fits within your  philosophy of teaching. You may have written a philosophy in EDU623 or  another prior course.
Ethics – Social Principles (.5 point): In one- to two-paragraphs, explain how this intervention relates to your social principles as an educator.
Ethics – Harm (1 point): In one- to two-paragraphs,  explain how the literature you reviewed leads you to believe what you  are doing is an appropriate intervention.
Ethics – Protection (.5 point): In one- to two-paragraphs, explain your planned measures to ensure you are protecting the study participants and doing no harm.
Ethics – Bias (.5 point): In one- to two-paragraphs, explain your planned measures to ensure the study yields unbiased results. 
Data Collection Procedures (1 point): In one page,  revise your triangulation matrix from the Week Three Triangulation  discussion adding a column that includes how and when you will collect  your data. This timeline will be hypothetical and approximate. The Data  Collection Procedures section can follow this example:

**The example is attached to this as a file as a PICTURE**PLEASE FOLLOW THE EXAMPLE!!!***
***I Have also attached my week 3 Assignment, just in case you need to follow from last week’s assignment**

 Written Communication
The assignment needs to adhere to the following areas for written communication.
 

Page Requirement (.5 point): The assignment must be five to six pages, not including title and references pages.
APA Formatting (.5 point): Use APA formatting consistently throughout.
Syntax and Mechanics (.5 point): Display meticulous  comprehension and organization of syntax and mechanics, such as spelling  and grammar. Your written work should contain no errors and be very  easy to understand.
Source Requirement (.5 point): Use no less than three  scholarly sources in addition to the course textbooks, providing  compelling evidence to support ideas. All sources on the reference page  need to be used and cited correctly within the body of the assignment.

 
Hey, all…just an IMPORTANT reminder, be sure your two and ONLY TWO research questions follow the template below:

Template:
Quantitative research question:
What is the difference in (scores, behavior, achievement, etc) when (your intervention) is applied over (period of time)?
Qualitative research question:
What is the perspective of (stakeholders, teachers, students, parents, etc) in regards to (your intervention)? 

Review and Submit the Assignment
Review your assignment with the Grading Rubric  to be sure you have achieved the distinguished levels of performance  for each criterion. Next, submit the assignment to the course room for  evaluation no later than day 7 of the week.
 
Carefully review the Grading Rubric  (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. for the criteria that will be used to evaluate your assignment.

   RESPONDING TO PEERS RESPOND TO PEER 1 ON ONE PAGE THEN PEER 2 ON ANOTHER PAGE

  
RESPONDING TO PEERS
RESPOND TO PEER 1 ON ONE PAGE THEN PEER 2 ON ANOTHER PAGE.

1. Choose two of your classmates who included suggestions that you would not use in the classroom.  

2. Explain to your classmates why you would not use their chosen strategy and why you would approach this with a different method. 

As a reminder, the Discussion Forum is a venue for academic thoughts.  Please be respectful with your responses.

Peer 1
  
  In the classroom

Sitting the   classroom
With things or objects that the children can   relate from their home or other places.
This promote   language and literacy by
Following direction   of two or more
Steps that relate to   familiar object and experiences.

Magnet squares   and small cars in the block area. The children learn how magnets stick   together in making a tower and they learn sizes math and science. Children   learn by placing cars in a row, counting, and matching.

Meal Time,   children will communicate with each other and the adult at the table.
 
   In the outdoor environment

Taking a walk   in the neighborhood will consist of real-life experience. They will notice   the meaning of being safe with guidance. Getting fresh air and exploring the environment.
Looking and touching   the
Nature that’s around   the
Children.

Listen to   directions and using their five senses as they walk in the neighborhood.
Learning colors of   trees and flowers and words and shapes of signs. Using their
large muscle skills,   climb walk, and run.

Exploring the   environment. Notice the plants, colors of leaves.
 

  In the home

Bring the   environment of different type of objects the child can use for play, example,   block area.

Bring in the   environment of
What the children   relate to at school. Example, dramatic play and block area.

Children and   parents have a play date together,

Peer 2

  In the classroom

Dramatic play area –   will consist of children   recreating real-life experiences. They will use make-believe on a variety of   topics. When the children pretend,   they recall and recreate their past experiences. This is achieved by   picturing their past experiences in their minds. 

Blocks and   other materials will assist the children learn different sizes and shapes,   math concepts, and how to solve problems. When the children move or stack   blocks, they will learn about size and weight, and make decisions regarding   how to build.

Singing and   moving to the beat of the music provide the children an opportunity to move   freely, feel good about their body movement, and an opportunity to practice   new skills. Singing together as a   group enhances their ability to work as a group.
 
   In the outdoor environment

In the outdoor   environment, the children can discuss what is seen, heard, touched, and felt   to familiarize them with the weather changes, the different seasons, and   growth of plants and animals.

The children   like to play outside and do things such as running, climbing, or jumping   which exercise their muscles. Also, they can play freely and inhale a breath   of fresh air. They not only exercise their muscles but they can view nature   that surround them.
Using colorful cubes   provide the children an opportunity to use their imagination for building and designing.

Playing freely   outside allows the children to make new friends and use their imagination and   gross motor skills.
 

  In the home

Creating a   fort resemble dramatic play and is a fun activity in the home for encouraging   a make-believe world from the perspective of the child

Collect small objects   such as rocks, seashells, or leaves. Suggest that the child sort the   different shapes of the seashells or those of the same size. Encourage the   children to explain their design or why things are grouped together.

Inviting classmates over for   parties or playdate is a good way for them to make friends with other   children.
   

   RESPONDING TO PEERS RESPOND TO PEER 1 ON ONE PAGE THEN PEER 2 ON ANOTHER PAGE

  
RESPONDING TO PEERS
RESPOND TO PEER 1 ON ONE PAGE THEN PEER 2 ON ANOTHER PAGE.

1. Respond to classmate by extending their thoughts on how we can help children develop autonomy.

PEER 1
Have you noticed that your toddler is having more tantrums? Have you wondered why this is happening? Maybe you feel as if it is a result of something that you have done. Maybe you think that they are trying to be independent and express themselves. Whatever the cause it can be very frustrating. Having a good understanding of what tantrums are, why they are happening, and how to help put a stop to them, can be beneficial to both the parents and the child(s).
Maybe you have heard of Erikson’s stages of development. The one that I will be discussing in this letter is the Autonomy versus shame and doubt stage. “During this stage, caregivers need to find an appropriate goodness-of-fit between adult expectations (e.g., neatness, schedules, obedience to rules) and what the toddler isdevelopmentally capable of doing. Firm, pleasant control—without a sense of shame—and calm, acceptinghandling of conflicts can increase toddler autonomy. Caregivers should not focus on the toddler’s temporaryfailures; rather, support should be given to help the toddler achieve developmental tasks. This sensitive yetfirm support of the child’s struggle for autonomy increases a sense of secure attachment because it builds abond between the child and the caregiver as the caregiver responds to the child’s unique needs, providesfeedback to the child’s behavior, interprets his or her signals, and plays affectionately with him or her” (Wardle, 2013).
There are many characteristics of a tantrum, that I am sure that you already know. However, there may be some that you haven’t realized yet. So what exactly is a tantrum defined as? According to the article, Kicking and Screaming: Is It Really A Tantrum?!?, “A temper tantrum is an uncontrollable release of anger, lasting longer than a few minutes. Screaming, throwing, yelling, hitting, crying, biting, and head-banging are all hallmarks of tantrum behavior. Understanding why young children are prone to fierce and powerful emotional outbursts can help parents respond effectively with compassion and empathy. So what are some of the characteristics that we were talking about before?
Age: Sometime between 12-18 months old children start having intense emotional outbursts typically known as “tantrums.” Some children may only exhibit mild tantrums, some do not have them until closer to age three, and a few children will never have outward tantrums at all.
Intense: All healthy children (and adults) will occasionally cry, become angry, and exhibit brief emotional outbursts as a normal part of living. However, tantrums are intensely loud and physical, and of long duration – sometimes lasting as long as 20-30 minutes.
Inevitable: During a tantrum, children really do “lose it” – they are no longer rational or in control of their actions. Although tantrums can sometimes be avoided or prevented, once it begins, a tantrum generally cannot be stopped until the rage and frustration are fully released by the child.
Normal: Temper tantrums can be frustrating for a parent, but they are a normal part of development for toddlers as they learn to cope with the ‘big feelings’ of frustration and anger.
Diverse: A child’s personality and temperament are factors determining how often and how intense their tantrums become. Children who have more expressive tantrums may be more challenging for parents to deal with, but frequent tantrums are not necessarily indicative of anything more than a lively personality.
           Now that we have an understanding of what the definition of a tantrum is and the characteristcs of said tantrum, how can we tackle this problem as a group? A great article to read for tantrums and how to help prevent them is, Temper Tantrum From KidsHealth. According to the article, “Tantrums should be handled differently depending on why your child is upset. Sometimes, you may need to provide comfort. Other times, its best to ignore an outburst and distract your child with a new activity. If your child is tired or hungry, it’s time for a nap or a snack. If a tantrum happens after your child is refused something, stay calm and don’t give a lot of explanations for why your child can’t have what he wants. Try to find something he can have. Move on to another activity with your child” (Temper Tantrum, 2018).
           I hope with this letter that you have a better understanding of what tantrums are, why they happen, how they can be prevented, and how to help your child through them. Although the are frustrating, as long as we work together, we can help control them better! If you have an questions or concerns, please feel free to ask them! I will be more than glad to help answer whatever questions you may have. Below I have a list of great articles that I found online that may be helpful to you.

PEER 2
There are many challenges to overcome in helping children develop autonomy. On of these challenges is separation anxiety. Separation anxiety is a very normal condition in infants and young children. It refers to the fear or anxiety of being separated from their parents or caregivers. Children experiencing separation anxiety may cry or become very upset when they know you’re leaving or after you have left, but will usually calm down afterwards. Separation anxiety is prominent among new students or students going through new changes in schedule, routine, or home life. Dealing with this particular challenge can be tricky, but children need to learn to self-soothe and calm themselves down. It is fine to stay a little longer during drop-off to help comfort them, but please do not change your routine or indulge in their wishes for you to stay for a long time or take them home. Children will usually overcome separation anxiety on their own once they come to realize that you being out of sight does not mean you are gone forever. If you are interested in learning more about separation anxiety, please visit https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/separation-anxiety (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..
Thank you for your time and please contact me if you have any questions or concerns.

     Week 3 discussion Adult Learning Theories” Please respond to the following:

    
Week 3 discussion
Adult Learning Theories” Please respond to the following:
· Watch the video below titled, “Andragogy (Adult Learning)” 


· Next, from the readings and video, use Knowles’ six (6) assumptions about adult learning to critique one (1) course or class in which you recently participated as either a student or instructor. 
· Determine which, if any, of Knowles’ assumptions were used in designing and delivering the instruction. Provide one (1) example from the instruction for each assumption used. If none of Knowles’ assumptions were used, speculate about the possible reason(s) for not using his assumptions. 
Week 3-can use as references 
· Reading(s)
o Bouchard, J. (2014). Transformative Learning. Transformative Learning – Research Starters Education, 1. 
o Merriam, S. B. (2001). Andragogy and Self-Directed Learning: Pillars of Adult Learning Theory. New Directions For Adult & Continuing Education, 2001(89). 
o Stoica, I. (2015). Adult Learning Theory. Adult Learning Theory – Research Starters Education, 1. 
o Weinstein, N. (2015). Experiential Learning. Experiential Learning – Research Starters Education, 1. 
· Video(s)
o Finley, Janet. (2010, May 17). Andragogy (Adult Learning) [Video file]. Retrieved from http://youtu.be/vLoPiHUZbEw 

Your job is to write about how I have developed as a writer, I have work complet

Your job is to write about how I have developed as a writer, I have work completed that you can read and quote it.
Teacher Rubric-
WRT 105: Cumulative Portfolio Assignment D. Smyth

Your last major assignment for WRT 105 is to complete a portfolio that analytically
reflects your progress in this course. You will want to do a good job on this task because
you will want to take it with you to college to demonstrate that you’ve accomplished
college level work, as you pursue credit for the course. In addition, it counts as 20% of
the course grade. Your reflection should fall between 3-4 pages and must follow usual
format.
Your portfolio will consist of a neatly arranged collection containing:
 A cover page/table of contents that lists each item in the portfolio in the order it
appears.
 A detailed, Reflexive Essay discussing your progress as a writer, thinker, student,
and person. This should also address each part of the portfolio, discussing what
the various assignments show about your progress and efforts.
 It is necessary to cite your own papers in order to precisely analyze how your
writing and thinking have evolved over time.
 The major papers you did for this course (Jumpstart, Analysis, Argument),
including and peer sheets, drafts WITH teacher comments, and rubrics.
 Additional assignments: starting with summer assignment through now,
including dialogic journals, reading notes, class notes, free writes, invention
portfolio cover pages, etc.
 No need to include hard copies of your research materials.
 Anything else you feel would be revealing or helpful.

    Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts. Make an

  

 Guided Response: Respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts. Make an effort to select a classmate with and without experience so as to think critically about both perspectives in relation to your own.    
For those without experience:  Share how your perception is changed regarding the importance of the three pillars of data management and provide feedback about their ideas for applying it to their own practice.
Your response

Andrea Thomas
What are the common reasons why staff members keep their data private from each other?  In what ways might you break down these barriers?
Some common reasons why staff members keep their data private from each other was that were some teachers who received low test scores for their students from the previous year. They were ashamed of themselves and often felt like they were a bad teacher. I think that I would have broken the barrier by picking my head and asking another fellow co-worker, “How can I do better?” or “How can I help my students improve their scores?’

For those with classroom and assessment experience, describe how easily accessible, openly shared, and deliberately arranged are your data today?
N/A

For those without such experience, discuss the importance of the 3 pillars of data management and how you intend to apply this to your anticipated practice.
I think the 3 pillars of data management could be very helpful to one who maybe entering the education field. Making sure that it is Easily Accessible would be very mindful so that the information can be accessed in a timely fashion. I think the school that I sub for the most uses grade speed which is a program that teachers can have access to the students that they share in different classes. This can help teachers figure out different strategies that can possibly help the student to get back on track which would also tie in together with Openly Shared. By having the Open Shared could also help brainstorm different strategies to help students achieve better scores for testing. It can also help to setup intervention meetings to help students to exceed in their work. I have noticed that the principal at the school I sub for have made charts and graphs and a spreadsheet to show where the school was as a whole for teachers. This was Deliberately Arranged. This benefits both the principal and teachers. It is one way to get the point across to the principal’s staff to help them improve their teaching styles.

What will you do to make your system for data management exceptional?
I think that when I become a first year teacher, I will be able to utilize the data management as a guide to help me grow into my teaching capabilities. I will learn how to collaborate with my peers and learn from them. It will also help me to become more vocal if I need help and not be ashamed to ask.

Lopez, D. (2013). No excuses university: How six exceptional systems are revolutionizing our schools (2nd ed.). Turnaround Schools Publications.

  
Tiffiny Thompson
What are the common reasons why staff members keep their data private from each other?  In what ways might you break down these barriers? 
One reason could be that they would not like for their ideas to be taken and changed around. 

For those with classroom and assessment experience, describe how easily accessible, openly shared, and deliberately arranged are your data today? 
Could not really answer this one 

For those without such experience, discuss the importance of the 3 pillars of data management and how you intend to apply this to your anticipated practice
I feel that the data that is presented as needed to be appropriate and apply to the task at hand. I also intend to share the data with the correct people needed at the time. 

What will you do to make your system for data management exceptional?
It is needed to get the correct data into the correct hands so things can function well. I will also choose to provide feedback to my colleagues, it is only fair. 

References 
Lopez, D. (2013). No excuses university: How six exceptional systems are revolutionizing our schools (2nd ed.). Turnaround Schools Publications
 

   RESPONDING TO PEERS RESPOND TO PEER 1 ON ONE PAGE THEN PEER 2 ON ANOTHER PAGE

  
RESPONDING TO PEERS
RESPOND TO PEER 1 ON ONE PAGE THEN PEER 2 ON ANOTHER PAGE.

1. Respond to classmate by extending their thoughts on how we can help children develop autonomy.

PEER 1
Have you noticed that your toddler is having more tantrums? Have you wondered why this is happening? Maybe you feel as if it is a result of something that you have done. Maybe you think that they are trying to be independent and express themselves. Whatever the cause it can be very frustrating. Having a good understanding of what tantrums are, why they are happening, and how to help put a stop to them, can be beneficial to both the parents and the child(s).
Maybe you have heard of Erikson’s stages of development. The one that I will be discussing in this letter is the Autonomy versus shame and doubt stage. “During this stage, caregivers need to find an appropriate goodness-of-fit between adult expectations (e.g., neatness, schedules, obedience to rules) and what the toddler isdevelopmentally capable of doing. Firm, pleasant control—without a sense of shame—and calm, acceptinghandling of conflicts can increase toddler autonomy. Caregivers should not focus on the toddler’s temporaryfailures; rather, support should be given to help the toddler achieve developmental tasks. This sensitive yetfirm support of the child’s struggle for autonomy increases a sense of secure attachment because it builds abond between the child and the caregiver as the caregiver responds to the child’s unique needs, providesfeedback to the child’s behavior, interprets his or her signals, and plays affectionately with him or her” (Wardle, 2013).
There are many characteristics of a tantrum, that I am sure that you already know. However, there may be some that you haven’t realized yet. So what exactly is a tantrum defined as? According to the article, Kicking and Screaming: Is It Really A Tantrum?!?, “A temper tantrum is an uncontrollable release of anger, lasting longer than a few minutes. Screaming, throwing, yelling, hitting, crying, biting, and head-banging are all hallmarks of tantrum behavior. Understanding why young children are prone to fierce and powerful emotional outbursts can help parents respond effectively with compassion and empathy. So what are some of the characteristics that we were talking about before?
Age: Sometime between 12-18 months old children start having intense emotional outbursts typically known as “tantrums.” Some children may only exhibit mild tantrums, some do not have them until closer to age three, and a few children will never have outward tantrums at all.
Intense: All healthy children (and adults) will occasionally cry, become angry, and exhibit brief emotional outbursts as a normal part of living. However, tantrums are intensely loud and physical, and of long duration – sometimes lasting as long as 20-30 minutes.
Inevitable: During a tantrum, children really do “lose it” – they are no longer rational or in control of their actions. Although tantrums can sometimes be avoided or prevented, once it begins, a tantrum generally cannot be stopped until the rage and frustration are fully released by the child.
Normal: Temper tantrums can be frustrating for a parent, but they are a normal part of development for toddlers as they learn to cope with the ‘big feelings’ of frustration and anger.
Diverse: A child’s personality and temperament are factors determining how often and how intense their tantrums become. Children who have more expressive tantrums may be more challenging for parents to deal with, but frequent tantrums are not necessarily indicative of anything more than a lively personality.
           Now that we have an understanding of what the definition of a tantrum is and the characteristcs of said tantrum, how can we tackle this problem as a group? A great article to read for tantrums and how to help prevent them is, Temper Tantrum From KidsHealth. According to the article, “Tantrums should be handled differently depending on why your child is upset. Sometimes, you may need to provide comfort. Other times, its best to ignore an outburst and distract your child with a new activity. If your child is tired or hungry, it’s time for a nap or a snack. If a tantrum happens after your child is refused something, stay calm and don’t give a lot of explanations for why your child can’t have what he wants. Try to find something he can have. Move on to another activity with your child” (Temper Tantrum, 2018).
           I hope with this letter that you have a better understanding of what tantrums are, why they happen, how they can be prevented, and how to help your child through them. Although the are frustrating, as long as we work together, we can help control them better! If you have an questions or concerns, please feel free to ask them! I will be more than glad to help answer whatever questions you may have. Below I have a list of great articles that I found online that may be helpful to you.

PEER 2
There are many challenges to overcome in helping children develop autonomy. On of these challenges is separation anxiety. Separation anxiety is a very normal condition in infants and young children. It refers to the fear or anxiety of being separated from their parents or caregivers. Children experiencing separation anxiety may cry or become very upset when they know you’re leaving or after you have left, but will usually calm down afterwards. Separation anxiety is prominent among new students or students going through new changes in schedule, routine, or home life. Dealing with this particular challenge can be tricky, but children need to learn to self-soothe and calm themselves down. It is fine to stay a little longer during drop-off to help comfort them, but please do not change your routine or indulge in their wishes for you to stay for a long time or take them home. Children will usually overcome separation anxiety on their own once they come to realize that you being out of sight does not mean you are gone forever. If you are interested in learning more about separation anxiety, please visit https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/separation-anxiety (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site..
Thank you for your time and please contact me if you have any questions or concerns.