Explanation of how the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules apply to EMRs.

 In text scholarly references are needed. 

 Post an explanation of how the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules apply to EMRs. Then, address the following questions and explain your reasoning:

· Can a social worker access any patient’s electronic medical record?
· Can a social worker access his or her own electronic medical record?
· Can a social worker access the electronic medical record of his/her family members?

Finally, explain the positive and negative ramifications HIPAA might have on medical social work practice in clinical settings with regard to handling EMRs.

What are greenhouse gases? How do they contribute to global warming?

Assignment 1: Social Impact of Population GrowthThe United Nations has hired you to be a consultant on global issues. One of the challenges is assessing the impact of population growth. There is no question that the world population will grow dramatically in the next decade throughout many countries of the world. The members of the UN are working to understand the impact that population growth has on society, specifically in developing countries. Your first project with the UN is to develop a whitepaper on three issues related to the population growth faced by one of these countries. Read the Case Study and provide an assessment based on the questions below.  (For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.)II. Overview
Our obsession with continual economic growth deters us from studying the role that an expanding population plays in global warming.[1]
About 3 billion years ago, the Earth suffered through a mass extinction caused by catastrophic volcanic activity in Siberia and wildfires that covered the entire planet. Since then, four more extinctions have eradicated up to 80% of all species each time. The world’s climatologists and scientists overwhelmingly agree that we are now on the verge of a sixth mass event that, over the next few tens of thousands of years, will wipe out nearly all living species on Earth — including humankind. This is not the stuff of science fiction or speculation, but rather the studied view of the people who are most qualified to make this kind of assessment. As anthropologist Richard Leaky, author of The Sixth Extinction,[2] wrote in 1995, “Homo sapiens might not only be the agent of the sixth extinction, but also risks being one of its victims.”This brings us to two issues worthy of reflection:  Does the rate at which people are reproducing need to be controlled to save the environment?  To what extent does human population growth impact global warming… and what can be done about it?[3] The answer to the first is quite simply “yes,” but the solution to the second is more problematic. The damage humans are doing to their climate is ruining the atmosphere surrounding their planet. At the rate this damage is increasing, at some point in the future there will be no atmosphere left to protect life on Earth from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation. Compared to other planets in our solar system, Earth has mild temperatures, thanks largely to the protective gases of its atmosphere. However, since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution (around 1775), those gases have become stuck in the atmosphere, causing heat radiating from the sun to reflect back to Earth (rather than exiting to space). The result is that oceans have become warmer and glaciers are melting, including parts of Antarctica. If we think of that continent as the stopper in a bottle, its melting away will release all the water it is holding back. This will raise sea levels to uncontrollable levels and flood coastal regions for miles inland. The two main culprits for this warming trend are carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane. These gases, called greenhouse gases, are trapped by the Earth’s atmosphere and, in turn, heat up the entire planet. It is worth noting that warming oceans are killing off kelp beds throughout the Earth’s oceans and coastlines at a prodigious rate. Not only do hundreds of millions of people depend on the fish that thrive on this ecosystem, but kelp is a natural absorbent of CO2. It purifies both the water around the kelp and the air we breathe.Population growth that consumes natural resources is partially to blame for the release of greenhouse gases, as are deforestation, soil erosion, and farming (overturned dirt releases CO2). The real issue, however, is the burning of fossil fuels (hydrocarbons) such as coal oil and natural gas, which have been produced by the organic remains of prehistoric organisms. The release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) such as refrigerants (used to cool the air in air conditioners and refrigerators), propellants in aerosol sprays, and solvents also contribute heavily to the depletion of the ozone layer in the Earth’s stratosphere. The stratosphere is responsible for filtering out much of the sun’s ultraviolet radiation, preventing humans from burning to death. Continuing to release these gases and CFCs into the atmosphere at these rates will have catastrophic effects on the Earth’s ecosystems and its level of biodiversity. Temperatures will warm by about two degrees Fahrenheit, changing weather patterns for the worse across the globe. In December 2017, the World Bank stated, “Climate change is an acute threat to global development and efforts to end poverty. Without urgent action, climate impacts could push an additional 100 million people into poverty by 2030.”[4]II. Case AssessmentThe world’s population is expanding at such a rate that some natural resources are being stripped from the environment. This case study deals with how global institutions are working to prevent the loss of these resources. It also deals with, in effect, the consequences of not having access to these resources.As the first section of your whitepaper for the UN, research the impact of population growth on society. Write a minimum of four pages assessing the impact, citing at least five credible sources in your research. As you compose the whitepaper, review the United Nations list of developing countries (available on the United Nations website). Select one country from the UN developing countries list to use as an example throughout your assessment. Please include: A cover page with your name, title of course, date, and the name of your instructorA one-half page introductionA middle section that is numbered and divided into three one-page sections. Each of these sections should answer one of the following questions: What are greenhouse gases? How do they contribute to global warming?What kinds of economic, security, political, and other challenges do these emissions pose to the people of the developing world, and who are the biggest offenders? Is there any way to control the growth of population on a global level?A one-half page conclusionCite at least five credible sources, excluding Wikipedia, dictionaries and encyclopedias for your assessment.For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.

   I need to write 200 words 1-Description of the organizational culture After

  
I need to write 200 words

1-Description of the organizational culture
After examining your organization, explain the corporate culture and what makes it easier or harder for the organization to be ethical.

Please use Johns Hopkins medical center
The organizational is 
Johns Hopkins medical center is located in the heart of downtown Baltimore Maryland. They are a cancer center, level 1 trauma center and a surgical teaching center. John Hopkins is world renowned for its innovation to medical technology and innovations.
Please make sure you have your references and  APA guidelines.

To what extent does human population growth impact global warming and what can be done about it?

 
 Assignment 1: Social Impact of Population Growth
The United Nations has hired you to be a consultant on global issues. One of the challenges is assessing the impact of population growth. There is no question that the world population will grow dramatically in the next decade throughout many countries of the world. The members of the UN are working to understand the impact that population growth has on society, specifically in developing countries. Your first project with the UN is to develop a whitepaper on three issues related to the population growth faced by one of these countries. Read the Case Study and provide an assessment based on the questions below.
(For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.)
II.  Overview
Our obsession with continual economic growth deters us from studying the role that an expanding population plays in global warming.[1]
About 3 billion years ago, the Earth suffered through a mass extinction caused by catastrophic volcanic activity in Siberia and wildfires that covered the entire planet. Since then, four more extinctions have eradicated up to 80% of all species each time. The world’s climatologists and scientists overwhelmingly agree that we are now on the verge of a sixth mass event that, over the next few tens of thousands of years, will wipe out nearly all living species on Earth — including humankind.
This is not the stuff of science fiction or speculation, but rather the studied view of the people who are most qualified to make this kind of assessment. As anthropologist Richard Leaky, author of The Sixth Extinction,[2] wrote in 1995, “Homo sapiens might not only be the agent of the sixth extinction, but also risks being one of its victims.”
This brings us to two issues worthy of reflection: 
Does the rate at which people are reproducing need to be controlled to save the environment? 
To what extent does human population growth impact global warming… and what can be done about it?[3] 
The answer to the first is quite simply “yes,” but the solution to the second is more problematic. The damage humans are doing to their climate is ruining the atmosphere surrounding their planet. At the rate this damage is increasing, at some point in the future there will be no atmosphere left to protect life on Earth from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation. Compared to other planets in our solar system, Earth has mild temperatures, thanks largely to the protective gases of its atmosphere.
However, since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution (around 1775), those gases have become stuck in the atmosphere, causing heat radiating from the sun to reflect back to Earth (rather than exiting to space). The result is that oceans have become warmer and glaciers are melting, including parts of Antarctica. If we think of that continent as the stopper in a bottle, its melting away will release all the water it is holding back. This will raise sea levels to uncontrollable levels and flood coastal regions for miles inland.
The two main culprits for this warming trend are carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane. These gases, called greenhouse gases, are trapped by the Earth’s atmosphere and, in turn, heat up the entire planet. It is worth noting that warming oceans are killing off kelp beds throughout the Earth’s oceans and coastlines at a prodigious rate. Not only do hundreds of millions of people depend on the fish that thrive on this ecosystem, but kelp is a natural absorbent of CO2. It purifies both the water around the kelp and the air we breathe.
Population growth that consumes natural resources is partially to blame for the release of greenhouse gases, as are deforestation, soil erosion, and farming (overturned dirt releases CO2). The real issue, however, is the burning of fossil fuels (hydrocarbons) such as coal oil and natural gas, which have been produced by the organic remains of prehistoric organisms. The release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) such as refrigerants (used to cool the air in air conditioners and refrigerators), propellants in aerosol sprays, and solvents also contribute heavily to the depletion of the ozone layer in the Earth’s stratosphere. The stratosphere is responsible for filtering out much of the sun’s ultraviolet radiation, preventing humans from burning to death.
Continuing to release these gases and CFCs into the atmosphere at these rates will have catastrophic effects on the Earth’s ecosystems and its level of biodiversity. Temperatures will warm by about two degrees Fahrenheit, changing weather patterns for the worse across the globe. In December 2017, the World Bank stated, “Climate change is an acute threat to global development and efforts to end poverty. Without urgent action, climate impacts could push an additional 100 million people into poverty by 2030.”[4]
II.  Case Assessment
The world’s population is expanding at such a rate that some natural resources are being stripped from the environment. This case study deals with how global institutions are working to prevent the loss of these resources. It also deals with, in effect, the consequences of not having access to these resources.
As the first section of your whitepaper for the UN, research the impact of population growth on society. Write a minimum of four pages assessing the impact, citing at least five credible sources in your research. As you compose the whitepaper, review the United Nations list of developing countries (available on the United Nations website). Select one country from the UN developing countries list to use as an example throughout your assessment. Please include:

A cover page with your name, title of course, date, and the name of your instructor
A one-half page introduction
A middle section that is numbered and divided into three one-page sections. Each of these sections should answer one of the following questions:

What are greenhouse gases? How do they contribute to global warming?
What kinds of economic, security, political, and other challenges do these emissions pose to the people of the developing world, and who are the biggest offenders?
Is there any way to control the growth of population on a global level?

A one-half page conclusion
Cite at least five credible sources, excluding Wikipedia, dictionaries and encyclopedias for your assessment.
For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.

This course requires use of new Strayer Writing Standards (SWS). The format is different than other Strayer University courses. Please take a moment to review the SWS documentation for details. (Note: You will be prompted to enter your Blackboard login credentials to view these standards.)
The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:

Evaluate the impacts of population growth and its negative impacts on global societies while considering multiple perspectives.

[1] George Gitlitz, ‘The Climate Problem – But Don’t Mention Population,’ Berkeleyside, June 19, 2018.
[2] Discover Magazine, July/August 2018, p. 55
[3] Larry LeDoux, ‘Does Population Growth Impact Climate Change,’ Scientific American, September 2018.
[4] Bill McKibben, ‘A Very Grim Forecast,’ Review Article of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Global Warming of 1.5°C: An IPCC Special Report, in The New York Review of Books, Vol. LXV, No. 18, November 22, 2018, p. 4.

How can a weak literature review diminish a research proposal?

A strong literature review not only plays a foundational role for setting up a research proposal and/or dissertation but also plays an important role in the results and discussion sections that are presented after the data has been collected and analyzed. As you move into this module’s discussion, consider all you have learned about the literature review including the continuing process you explored in this module’s readings.
Tasks:
In a minimum of 400 words, post your responses to the following:
Part 1:

Why is the literature review a needed piece of a research proposal? How can a weak literature review diminish a research proposal?
Once the data has been collected and you are moving into the completion of the research report, how will you continue to pull from your literature review in the results and discussion section of your report?

Part 2:

What did you find to be the most valuable task in the research or writing process?
What strengths and weaknesses did you find in yourself through the research and writing process that you covered in this course?
How do you see yourself applying the skills you have gained through this course in your future career in human services research?

Identify and describe the stages of a constructive conflict process.

In Chapter 1 of the text, Managing Conflict Through Communication, the five stages in a constructive conflict process are explained. Write a paper in which you identify a conflict that you or someone you know has had and has already been resolved. Identify and describe the five stages of a constructive conflict process. Then, apply each of the five stages of a constructive conflict process to your example. Your paper should clearly identify each stage and provide details or examples for each stage. You can review Examples 1 and 2 on pages 15-16 of the text for ideas on how to organize this assignment.

The paper must be one to two pages in length (excluding title and reference pages) and formatted according to APA style. You must use at least two scholarly resources (at least one of which can be found in the Ashford Online Library) other than the textbook to support your claims and sub claims. Cite your resources in text and on the reference page.

Explain how conflict can have productive results.

Conflict can be productive. Although when most people are surveyed, they have a negative view of conflict. 
Explain how conflict can have productive results. What are some skills needed to effectively manage conflict? Discuss why many people have a negative view of conflict. Identify ways that a person can begin to view conflict in a positive manner. 
Your initial response should be 250 – 300 word

What responsibility do countries have with regard to the rest of the worlds access to non-renewable resources?

Accessing Non-Renewable Resources

Countries with access to the planet’s resources continue to grow at a great pace, placing a tremendous strain on the availability of non-renewable resources. What responsibility do these countries have with regard to the rest of the world’s access to these resources?

What is food insecurity and what role does population growth play in it?

Assignment 2: Poverty and Food Security
The members of the United Nations appreciated the content you provided on population growth. Now they are asking you to expand the whitepaper to include global food security as it relates to population growth and poverty. Read the Case Study and provide an assessment based on the questions below.
(For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.)
Overview
We can view global food security as the effort to build food systems that can feed everyone, everywhere, and every day by improving food quality and promoting nutritional agriculture.[1] That said, there are certain practices that can advance this project:

Identifying the underlying causes of hunger and malnutrition
Investing in country-specific recovery plans
Strengthening strategic coordination with institutions like the UN and the World Bank
Developed countries making sustained financial commitments to the success of the project

We must bear in mind that more than three billion people, nearly one-half of the global population, subsist on as little as $2.50 a day and that nearly 1.5 billion are living in extreme poverty on less than $1.25 a day. According to the World Health Organization, the United Nations, and other relief agencies, about 20,000 people (mostly children) starve to death in the world every day, for a total of about seven million people a year.
In addition, about 750 million (twice the population of the United States) do not have access to clean drinking water, meaning that some one million people die every year from diarrhea caused by water-borne diseases.
The population of Earth is expected to grow from 7 billion in 2010 to 8 billion in 2025, 9 billion in 2040, and 11 billion by the end of the 21st century.[2] If the demand for food is predicted to grow by 50% by 2030 and 70% by 2050, the real problem is not necessarily growing that much food. Rather, it is making that amount available to people.
Moreover, foodborne illnesses are prevalent, with nearly 600 million reported cases of foodborne diseases each year. These affect mainly children, but also negatively impact the livelihood of farmers, vendors, trade associations and, ultimately, the Gross Domestic Product (national income) of a country. These issues can impose tremendous human, economic, social, and fiscal costs on countries Addressing them allows governments to devote more resources to making desperately needed improvements in infrastructure that raise the quality of life for everyone.
It is not enough to have adequate supplies of food available. Policies that focus exclusively on food production can exacerbate the problem, particularly if, to satisfy the need for quantity, the quality of the food is left wanting.
Reasons for Food Insecurity
Certainly, poverty and the systemic internal conditions creating it inside a country are the unmistakable driving factors behind keeping adequate food resources from reaching people. It is only one factor of several, however. Others include the following:
Inadequate Food Distribution: The reality is that there is more than enough food in the world to feed its people. The primary cause of famines is not poor weather conditions as much as it is getting the needed amount of food to the people who need it most. Quite often causes result from political instability and poor infrastructure, often involving a country’s port facilities, transportation availability and quality of road networks. Paradoxically, although the population is going to increase in the coming decades, the amount of food potentially available will increase along with it. This is due mostly to advances in bio agricultural engineering and increased seed immunity to molds.
Writing in the late 18th century, Thomas Malthus warned that global population would exceed the capacity of Earth to grow food, in that while population would grow exponentially, food production would grow only arithmetically. Although this theory has been proven invalid, the unfortunate result of its propagation has been for some governments to rationalize political choices that avoid helping the poverty-ridden and starving.
Political-Agricultural Practices: The widespread use of microbiological, chemical, and other forms of pesticides in food continues to be a serious issue throughout the global food chain. Widespread use of fertilizers also causes illness in millions of people every year, not only from the food itself, but from run-off into streams and rivers, contaminating entire water supplies. The human, social, and economic costs of such practices impede improvements being made not only in the raising of crops, but in their distribution. Added to this, the rising demand in developed countries for biofuels, currently refined mostly from corn and soy beans, reduces the amount of arable land devoted to producing food.
The failure of many farmers in the developing world to rotate their crops harms the replenishing of nutrients necessary to continue growing crops. In addition, the repeated use of agricultural land without allowing it to lie fallow in order to replenish needed soil nutrients thereby increasing fertility and maximizing crop yield results in reduced agricultural output and insufficient crop yields.
Economic Issues: The fact is, government policies that focus on growing cash crops, for example, are designed solely to export them to earn foreign exchange. This may be fine for the government in its efforts to earn money, but the result is that farmers end up growing for foreign markets and not domestic ones. This leads to shortages of necessary staples. Consequently, the poorest of the population are frozen out of the local markets because they cannot afford the food that remains to be sold.[3]
Civil Strife: Civil war can interrupt the flow of food from gathering depots, such as ports, to distribution centers where it can be handed out to people. During the 1990s, Somalia was particularly hard hit by their civil war, as clans fought for control of the main port at Mogadishu. This affected the flow of food to the rest of the population. In this case, as with many civil wars, whoever controls the supply of food controls the country. In failed and failing states like Zimbabwe, Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, South Sudan, Yemen, and Libya, food very often is another weapon used by one segment of the population against another.
II. Case Assessment
The issue is not the lack of food in the world, but the access to food. Simply put, food is not getting to where it needs to be in time. In developing countries, the food shortage is due to governmental control over food. These governments maintain their control and preference for certain groups by limiting access of nutritious food to certain other groups. The result is the weaponizing of food.
In this second part of your whitepaper, research the impact of poverty on global food security and the technology available potentially to remedy this situation. Write a minimum of four pages assessing the impact, citing at least five credible sources in your research. Refer specifically to the role these issues have had in the developing country of your choice. In this assessment, please include:

A cover page with your name, title of the course, date, and the name of your instructor
A one-half page introduction
A middle section that is numbered and divided into three one-page sections. Each of these sections should answer one of the following questions:

What is food insecurity and what role does population growth play in it?
What factors specifically interrupt the flow of food from the source to the people in the developing country you selected?
What forms of technology can be used to reduce hunger and improve food security? Explain how these technical solutions can do that.

A one-half page conclusion
Cite at least five credible sources excluding Wikipedia, dictionaries, and encyclopedias for your assessment.
For a brief list of resources for this assignment, please see the end of the course guide.

This course requires use of new Strayer Writing Standards (SWS). The format is different than other Strayer University courses. Please take a moment to review the SWS documentation for details. (Note: You will be prompted to enter your Blackboard login credentials to view these standards.)
The specific course learning outcomes associated with this assignment are:

Propose a plan to address the issue of global food security in underdeveloped countries that considers the impact of prior solutions. 

[1] For a good overview of food security in general, see Peter Timmer, Food Security and Scarcity: Why Ending Hunger Is So Hard, Foreign Affairs, May/June 2015, Reviewed by Richard N. Cooper.[2]World Population Prospects, United Nations Population Division, 2017.[3] Will Martin, Food Security and Poverty: A Precarious Balance,The World Bank, (Blog, Lets Talk Development), November 5, 2010.

How does the mental health professional working with addiction prepare and support the mental health care team and the client?

  
Controversy surrounding the treatment of substance abuse disorders with other substances extends from the most basic to the philosophical. Some health care providers focus on the removal of all substances to address the addiction and argue that complete abstinence is the only real option. They believe that no medications should be given (except to save one’s life) during treatment for substance abuse. Many mental health professionals, particularly in America, hold these views. In contrast to removing all substances, others focus on the ability of the client to function. Many programs support the belief that addicts can live normal lives with controlled use of substances.
How do these opposing views in the treatment of addiction clients affect the addiction mental health practice? How does the mental health professional working with addiction prepare and support the mental health care team and the client? How do programs like the 12-step Narcotics Anonymous program compare with other approaches as far as research results?
For this Discussion, select a medication used in treating substance abuse disorders. Then, conduct a search for any controversy surrounding the use of this medication in treating substance abuse disorders and prepare to defend its use.
Post 
A description of the major actions, intended effects, and side effects of your selected medication.
Explain controversy surrounding the use of this medication in treating substance abuse disorders. 
Defend the effective use of this medication and support your defense with evidence from the Learning Resources or from your personal research.

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